Category Archives: Ideas

Nutraceuticals

Paul Noth, New York­er mag­a­zine

Evaluation of a “Critical Mass” agreement on agriculture

The stale­mate in Gene­va on the Decem­ber 2013 Bali Agree­ment con­cern­ing both Trade Facil­i­a­tion and agri­cul­ture sub­si­dies has revived some inter­est in the poten­tial for a pluri­lat­er­al agree­ment on Agri­cul­ture among WTO mem­bers. I attach to this brief post a pre-print of the sum­ma­ry that Andy Stol­er and I wrote for the jour­nal Glob­al Gov­er­nance […]

They never talk about trade

The trade and invest­ment poli­cies of the two main polit­i­cal par­ties in Aus­tralia have flip-flopped in cho­rus over the years so they hard­ly ever fig­ure in elec­tion debates. As if they didn’t mat­ter enough to fight about. Yet there’s lit­tle that mat­ters more to the future pros­per­i­ty of a small, open, still-some­what-remote econ­o­my than build­ing […]

Governed by the gutless?

Alan Beattie’s new book­let “Who’s in Charge Here” (Ama­zon) is an amus­ing, accu­rate, acces­si­ble account of the cur­rent mess in glob­al finan­cial and trade “gov­er­nance.” Well worth the $3 price. But he draws a “les­son” from his lit­tle his­to­ry of the crises of 2008–2011 that I find un-sat­is­­fy­ing. Who’s in Charge Here is a valu­able […]

A bearish view of global governance

If there were a rat­ings agency for the cred­i­bil­i­ty of “glob­al gov­er­nance” insti­tu­tions, the WTO’s would have been down­grad­ed to a “B” at best[1] after the col­lapse of the Doha Round nego­ti­a­tions. The triple crown of benign glob­al gov­er­nance — a pros­per­ous, well-reg­u­lat­ed glob­al “com­mons,” the sov­er­eign­ty of nation-states and the assent of the gov­erned […]

The unanswered question about 9–11

Robert Fisk is such a reward­ing his­to­ri­an of inter­na­tion­al pol­i­cy because his con­tacts are so broad and his expe­ri­ence is so long and because he writes so clear­ly, pas­sion­ate­ly and thought­ful­ly about the per­sis­tent fail­ures of West­ern policy—and humanity—in the Mid­dle East. There, the UK, France and the Unit­ed States direct­ly or through their occa­sion­al […]

Larkin ascending

Near­ly missed it; an intel­li­gent, allu­sive, gos­sipy memo­r­i­al of Philip Larkin by Mar­tin Amis in the FT. A teas­er for Amis’s forth­com­ing col­lec­tion of Larkin poems. Amis apt­ly quotes lots of them in his arti­cle; which is, in part, what makes it such fun to read. This is the key to Larkin: his fric­tion­less mem­o­ra­bil­i­ty. […]